Inspirations

These are all kinds of things that inspire me. Here are some in no particular order or preference.

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“LISTENING”

“I hope that you will listen, but not with the memory of what you already know; and this is very difficult to do. You listen to something, and your mind immediately reacts with its knowledge, its conclusions, its opinions, its past memories. It listens, inquiring for a future understanding.

Just observe yourself, how you are listening, and you will see that this is what is taking place. Either you are listening with a conclusion, with knowledge, with certain memories, experiences, or you want an answer, and you are impatient. You want to know what it is all about, what life is all about, the extraordinary complexity of life. You are not actually listening at all.

You can only listen when the mind is quiet, when the mind doesn’t react immediately, when there is an interval between your reaction and what is being said. Then, in that interval there is a quietness, there is a silence in which alone there is a comprehension which is not intellectual understanding.

If there is a gap between what is said and your own reaction to what is said, in that interval, whether you prolong it indefinitely, for a long period or for a few seconds – in that interval, if you observe, there comes clarity. It is the interval that is the new brain. The immediate reaction is the old brain, and the old brain functions in its own traditional, accepted, reactionary, animalistic sense.

When there is an abeyance of that, when the reaction is suspended, when there is an interval, then you will find that the new brain acts, and it is only the new brain that can understand, not the old brain”     — Jiddu Krishnamurti

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The Ten Oxherding Songs

In Zen, a herdboy’s search for his lost oxen has served as a parable for a practitioner’s pursuit of enlightenment since this Buddhist sect’s early history in China. In the eleventh century, the Song-dynasty Zen master Guoan Shiyuan (active ca. 1150) codified the parable into ten verses (gāthā), recorded and illustrated in this handscroll. The parable proceeds from the herdboy losing his ox and following its tracks to recover the animal to, in the next-to-last verse, transcending this world. In a final stage representing the attainment of Buddhist enlightenment, the herdboy becomes one with Budai (Japanese: Hotei), the manifestation of the future Buddha Miroku (Sanskrit: Maitreya). Dated by an inscription to 1278, the present scroll is the earliest known Japanese illustrated copy of the parable and the only extant version with colour illustrations.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
1 The Search For The Bull

 
1. The search for the bull
In the pasture of this world, I endlessly push aside the tall grasses in search of the bull. 
Following unnamed rivers, lost upon the interpenetrating paths of distant mountains, 
My strength failing and my vitality exhausted, I cannot find the bull. 
I only hear the locusts chirring through the forest at night.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
2 Discovering The Footprints

 
2. Discovering the footprints
Along the riverbank under the trees, I discover footprints! 
Even under the fragrant grass I see his prints. 
Deep in remote mountains they are found. 
These traces no more can be hidden than one’s nose, looking heavenward.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
3 Perceiving The Bull

 
3.  Perceiving the bull
I hear the song of the nightingale. 
The sun is warm, the wind is mild, willows are green along the shore, 
Here no bull can hide! 
What artist can draw that massive head, those majestic horns?

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660

 
4.  Catching the bull
I seize him with a terrific struggle. 
His great will and power are inexhaustible. 
He charges to the high plateau far above the cloud-mists, 
Or in an impenetrable ravine he stands.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
5 Taming The Bull

 
5. Taming the bull
The whip and rope are necessary. 
Else he might stray off down some dusty road. 
Being well trained, he becomes naturally gentle. 
Then, unfettered, he obeys his master.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
6 Riding The Bull Home

 
6. Riding the bull home
Mounting the bull, slowly I return homeward. 
The voice of my flute intones through the evening. 
Measuring with hand-beats the pulsating harmony, I direct the endless rhythm. 
Whoever hears this melody will join me.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
7 The Bull Transcended

 
7. The bull transcended
Astride the bull, I reach home. 
I am serene.  The bull too can rest. 
The dawn has come.  In blissful repose, 
Within my thatched dwelling I have abandoned the whip and rope.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
8 Both Bull And Self Transcended

 
8.  both bull and self transcended
Whip, rope, person, and bull — all merge in No-Thing. 
This heaven is so vast no message can stain it. 
How may a snowflake exist in a raging fire? 
Here are the footprints of the patriarchs.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
9 Reaching The Source

 
9.  Reaching the source
Too many steps have been taken returning to the root and the source. 
Better to have been blind and deaf from the beginning! 
Dwelling in one’s true abode, unconcerned with that without — 
The river flows tranquilly on and the flowers are red.

The Ten Ox-Herding Songs, 1278 Japan, Kamakura period (1185–1333) Handscroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 1 ft. 1/4 in. x 20 ft. 6 in. (31.1 x 624.8 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Mary Griggs Burke Collection, Gift of the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation, 2015 (2015.300.10) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/53660
10 In The World

 
10. In the world
Barefooted and naked of breast, I mingle with the people of the world. 
My clothes are ragged and dust-laden, and I am ever blissful. 
I use no magic to extend my life; 
Now, before me, the dead trees become alive.

 

Pillars of Light Music